PEDIATRIC DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES

Below we have compiled a list from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. This list is a very brief overview of some of things to expect at various ages. If you have ANY concerns that may or may not be listed, it is better to seek help early. One of our therapists would be more than happy to setup a free consultation with you and discuss your childs’ unique situation.

Research shows that the earlier the intervention, the quicker and easier, the remediation of a delay or disorder will be. Please don’t hesitate to call. Our promise is to tell you our professional opinion based on years of education in the field and working with 1,000’s of children, and leave the final decision up to you.

3 months – startles to loud sounds, quiets/smiles when spoken to, makes pleasure sounds (cooing ‘ahhh’ ‘eee’), cries differently for different needs

6 months – moves eyes in direction of sounds, responds to changes in tone of your voice, notices toys that make noise, babbling sounds more speech-like with many different sounds including p, b, and m

12 months – enjoys games like peek-a-boo, listens when spoken to, recognizes words for common items like “cup”, “shoe”, or “book”, uses gestures like waving or holding arms up to be picked up, has at least one real word

*PREMATURE – babies born premature (before 38 weeks gestation) are expected to meet these milestones based on full-term due dates. (i.e. baby born at 30 weeks gestation would not be expected to meet 12 month milestones until 22 (12+10) months old.

“Red flags” (when to refer)

  • Child doesn’t respond to noises
  • Not yet babbling (consonant-vowel combinations) by 9 months

18 months – points to a few body parts, follows simple directions (like “Kiss the baby,” or “Where’s your shoe?”), approximately 50 different words, begins to say two words together like “baby go” and “mama up”

24 months – able to understand what the child says at least 50% of the time, uses a variety of consonant and vowel sounds, uses 2-3 word phrases, approximately 150 different words

*PREMATURE – babies born premature (before 38 weeks gestation) are expected to meet these milestones based on full-term due dates. (i.e. baby born at 30 weeks gestation would not be expected to meet 18 month milestones until 28 (18+10) months old.

“Red flags” (when to refer)

  • Child does not respond to his name
  • Child has 10 words or less by 18 months
  • Is not using two word phrases by 24 months
  • Understands some differences in meaning like “go-stop,” “in-on,” “up-down,” “big-little”
  • Follows two step directions (“get the book and put it on the table”)
  • Listens and enjoys hearing stories for longer periods of time
  • Has a word for almost everything
  • Uses 3 words at a time
  • Uses /m,p,b,t,d,n,k,g,s,h,w/ consonant sounds
  • Speech is understood most of the time (at least 80%) by others
  • Begins to ask “why?”

“Red flags” (when to refer)

  • Child does not use 2 and/or 3 word phrases consistently
  • Limited speech sounds in inventory (prefers certain sounds versus a variety)
  • Child is difficult to understand (less than 80%) by adults familiar with the child’s speech
  • Repeating words, phrases, and sounds can be typical at this age. Find out more about typical versus atypical stuttering in toddlers-preschoolers here.
  • Hears you when you call from another room
  • Understands some colors and shapes
  • Talks about what happened during the day, using ~4 sentences at a time
  • Answers simple “who?”, “what?”, and “where?” questions
  • Asks “why?”, “when?” and “how?” questions
  • Uses pronouns, like I, you, me, we, they
  • Uses plural -s (cats, toys)
  • Uses 4+ words at a time

“Red flags” (when to refer)

  • Does not respond to her name
  • Difficulty following directions with more than one step
  • Difficulty answering simple questions
  • Limited vocabulary or short sentences (most sentences are less than 4 words)
  • Difficulty being understood by those not familiar with the child’s speech
  • Repeating words, phrases, and sounds can be typical at this age. Find out more about typical versus atypical stuttering in preschoolers here.
  • Understands words for order like first, next, and last
  • Understands words for time like yesterday, today, and tomorrow
  • Hears and understands most of what is said at home and in school
  • Uses all speech sounds in words but may make mistakes on harder sounds like /l, s, r, v, z, ch, sh, th/
  • Responds to “What did you say?”
  • Talks without repeating sounds or words most of the time
  • Tells a story
  • Keeps conversation going
  • Talks in different ways depending on the listener and place. May use short sentences with younger children or talk louder outside than inside.

“Red flags” (when to refer)

  • Difficulty being understood by those not familiar with the child’s speech
  • Difficulty saying the following sounds /m, p, b, t, d, n, f, k, g, ng, s, w, h/
  • Difficulty telling and/or retelling a short story
  • Difficulty maintaining conversation
  • Difficulty with pronouns and/or verb tenses (past/present tenses)
  • Repeating words, phrases, and sounds can be typical at this age. Find out more about typical versus atypical stuttering in preschoolers here.

COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

Speech-Language Pathologist and audiologist believe lack of awareness is the leading barrier to early detection 45%
Parents unaware of early warning signs 64%
Parents don't realize that without early detection treatment takes longer and is more expensive 57%
Individuals don't know that misuse of personal audio technology may cause hearing loss 45%
Individuals think untreated hearing loss among elderly is an acceptable part of aging. 70%

For more information, visit Identify the Signs.